George Long, Impressed Midshipman

Following is the interesting pension testimony of George Long (#S-18087) transcribed by Joseph Ross in May of 2013 which details his experience of being unjustly impressed on the Continental Navy frigate Warren. By virtue of his proven service in the Continental Army, Long was permitted a pension and therefore had standing to recount his compulsory unpaid naval service for posterity.

“I George Long of Portsmouth, State of Newhampshire, Merchant of the Age of seventy years & upward- Son of Col. Pierce Long who Commanded the first New Hampshire Regiment- Testify and say that in May 1776 (as well as I can remember having lost Col. Long’s two Commissions and Regimental books in the Great fire of 1816- when I lost my store) Col. Long was by the then provincial-Government appointed to the command of the first New hampshire Regiment, his officers were Lt. Col. Mooney- Major Hodgdon, both of Dover- some of the Captains were Ebenezar Dearing of the artillery- [blank] of the infantry- Capt. Mark Wiggin- Perkins- Barnard- Hilton- Adjutant James McClure- paymaster Noah Emery, both of Exeter- Rev. E Evans Chaplain- all stationed about the harbour of Portsmouth for its defence (the British had then held Boston)- that your deponent was attach’d to said Regiment by Col. Long as his Clerk- whose duty was to be at head Quarters- copied all Reg’l orders- delivered them daily to Adjutant McClure, who delivered them to the several Companies- your deponent continued with Col. Long executing the duty aforesaid, so long as Col. Long continued in the service. In July 1776, Col. Long received Orders from Gen’l Washington (as I then understood) that the first New hampshire Regim’t would no longer be paid by the Province and that they must be reinlisted into the Continental service, and would receive Pay accordingly- Col. Long immediately issued orders to the several Captains in the Reg’t to this effect- which brought the whole Reg’t together, were the Orders were read; requiring a new inlistment- immediately every man in the Reg’t came forward and signed a new roll for one year,on the Continental establishment, with the exception of two subalterns,Abner Blasdell and Stacy Hall (who gave reason they were unable to leave their families for a length of time should the Reg’t be ordered to the northern frontiers (Lake Champlain) where it was tho’t it would go, in the course of the year) a very few months after the inlistment, the Reg’t was ordered to Ticonderoga (Lake Champlain)- that in Nov or December following- Col. Long detach’d the several Companies belonging to the his Regim’t to their place of destination; through Exeter, Charlestown, over the Green Mountains to Ticonderoga where Col. Mooney and Maj’r Hodgdon had previously gone to receive the attachm’t as they should arrive- On or about the last of December- Col. Long with Adjutant McClure, myself & a servant of Col. L’s in a Sley with two horses & baggage, left Portsmouth to join the Reg’t at Ticonderoga- we arrived some time in January 1777- this station was commanded by Gen’l Arthur St. Clair who shortly afterward placed Col. Long in command of Mount Independence (a formidable Fortress on the East side & opposite Ticonderoga) with both Col. Long’s Reg’t & that of Col. Hay- we remained there all winter & spring without anything material taking place- shortly after the weather moderated, say June 1777- Gen’l Bourgoine with his whole force- 11,000 strong, made a movement from Québec up the lakes direct for Ticonderoga- Gen’l St. Clair knowing his own weakness tho’t prudent to convene a Council of War on the 5th July (at night) who decided to Evacuate (I your deponent hear’g Gen’l St. Clair say by doing so it would be the Salvation of the Country, for reason it would encourage the Enemy to advance, when the people seeing the necessity, would turn out en mass and await the foe) which eventually proved Gen’l St. Clair a prophet. The whole establishment on the morning evacuated the place with much precipitation, the troops took different routes some by land & some by water- to Col. Long was given in charge the American fleet of several Sch’s of 12 & 10 Guns, with several floating batteries; on board of this fleet Col. Long embark’d his Reg’t- with a few others were closely persued by the Whole English fleet, much superior to the American- they having one Ship of 20 Guns with several Brigs and schooners- Col. Long was enabled to reach the Landing at Sheensboro, only time enough to land his men & destroy his fleet; here your deponent with Wm Dearing a Drummer in the Artillery, were sent by Col. Long to Onion River (with a guide) to bring Col. Long’s two horses (which had been put there to board) when we were there. Mr. Van (something) informed us the Horses were all stolen & carried away some time since by a party of the enemy’s Indians and Canadian Tories- Col. Long after forming his men on the Bank, took up his march toward Fort Ann, where he was overtaken by the British 9th Reg’t under Lt. Col. Hill, where a severe conflict ensued, which terminated in Col. Long’s taking several prisoners, and without further molestation on the next morning, moved toward Saratoga to join the main body under Gen’l Gates- before Col. Long could reach that place with his Reg’t, the time for which they had enlisted expired (one year) the largest part of the Reg’t took their discharge and returned to their houses (with the exception of four officers who remained with Col. Long- Viz. James McClure Adjutant- Lt Meshuch Bell- Noah Emery paymaster- and Rev. E Evans Chaplain, these all joined the Main Army at Saratoga as Volunteers, continued and assisted in capturing Gen’l Bourgoine & his Army- and then returned to their houses in New hampshire- Col. Long returned to Portsmouth about first of Dec 1777- without health, money, or clothing, except what he rode in having had his Trunk with his clothing, as also the pay of himself and the Officers with him captured by the enemy, in the retreat from Sheensboro toward Fort Ann. I hope Sir I have not consumed your time unnecessarily, in detailing the services of Col. Long but I think you will readily see the necessity of my so doing in Order to show that of your deponent- who was with the Regim’t in Portsmouth in the Provincial service, as well as Continental service eight months- then on the Northern frontier until the time of the Regim’t expired- making together at least Fourteen months- Your deponent takes leave to remark- that his duty confined him closely to Col. Long’s quarters where but few belonging to the Regim’t had much intercourse; these few were Lt. Col. Mooney, Maj’r Hodgdon, Adjutant McClure, the Chaplain, Noah Emery paymaster as well the several captains all have been gathered to their fathers for many years, as well as Col. Constant Freeman late 4th Auditor in the Navy Department- he belonged to Col. Long’s Reg’t, was about my Age, we knew each other well, and kept acquaintances so long as Col. F. lived- so that at this late period I know of no person who knew my particular services in the War of the Revolution. Again in July 1778, your deponent went with Col. Long and a Company of Horse among which was Gov. John Langdon and the late District Judge John S. Sherburne, as Volunteers to R. Island and there joined Gen’l Sullivan, was near when Judge Sherburne lost his leg- Col. Long here acted as Aid to Gen’l Sullivan- until the American army made good their retreat, with all the Stores off the Island and on to the Maine- after this the Volunteers all returned to Portsmouth- this expedition consumed two months- I do not remember that Col. Long ever rec’d any pay- this I know I rec’d nothing. In the same year your deponent, engaged in the Sea services in a ship of 20 Guns & 130 men & did go with Capt. Moses Brown, James McClure was first Liut. (the same who had been Adjutant of Col. Long’s Reg’t- he having been bro’t up to the Sea) in this ship we encountered a British Ship- about one hour & captured her, in this action we had 2 kill’d & 9 wounded; among the latter- Lt. McClure lost his leg- In May 1779, I entered on board the Polly John Palmer commander- 10 Guns & 25 men, Our 1st Lt. was James Falls, 2nd Lt. Burns- your deponent Master’s Mate, we sailed in Co. with three other Ships Sally, Capt. Holmes 18 Guns 60 men, Minerva Capt. Grimes 10 Guns 40 men, Cadwallader 10 Guns 30 men- after being at Sea two days- we encountered a British Ship named Blaize Castle- Capt. Shepherd of 22 guns &130 men; from Halifax- this ship was engaged by the whole fleet (alternately) for 2 & half hours when she struck her colours- we had one killed & Capt. wounded- the others had more or less kill’d and wounded- the whole of us not so many as the enemy; they had laying on her Deck (when your deponent went on board the enemy immediately after striking to us) 13 dead men & they told us they had 30 or 40 wounded- with our prize we all came to Boston to repair damages (which were considerable in sails and rigging)- after refitting and nearly ready for Sea, an embargo was laid on all vessels in Port- for reason, that an Armament was fitting out by the State of Massachusetts, under sanction of Congress; called the Penobscott Expedition; for the purpose of recapturing a Fort on Penobscott River (then an integral part of Massachusetts) which had been in the possession of the British some time- there were assembled in Boston Harbour about 20 Ships & Brigs and other armed Vessels for this expedition (a list of which I have forwarded at this time) among which were two belonging to the U. States, the largest was the US Frigate Warren- Dudley Saltonstall Esq. Commodore of the fleet, 36 guns- the other the Sloop Providence 10 Guns- a few days before the departure of the fleet for Penobscott (say July) a boat with several Officers came on board Our vessel, the head man’s name was Dane or Dana (as I heard him address’d) he ordered our Capt’n to muster all his Crew forthwith which was done, We were then told by this Gentleman; that we must all go on board the US Frigate Warren, Commodore Saltonstall, she wanting Seaman (to this we one & all objected) we were then told, if we did not go- freely, we should be compelled so to do (a guard was left on board our Vessel as well as onboard every one of our consorts as I understood) the next day we were Transhipp’d to on board the US Frigate Warren. Your deponent asked the Officers from shore if we were impressed, the answer was you may call it what you please, shortly after being on board the Warren frigate- we the impressed men were mustered; when a Roll or Shipping Paper was presented to each of us to sign, which your deponent, not only refused to do but advised all his associates not to sign- we were then told by a Lieutenant if we did not sign the Ship’s Roll- we would not receive any Wages (which proved to be true) I never rec’d a Cent. I observed to him if we signed the articles we should be considered as having voluntarily become part of the Crew (which was not the case) as we were impress’d men- we chose to remain as such- being a Petty Officer on board our own Ship, I acted as Midshipman on board the Warren. The fleet all left Boston in July (of this I am not positive) in a few days arriv’d before Penobscott (called Braggaduce) where much time was consumed in Councils of War & nothing decisively done- suffice it to say a Superior British fleet arrived from New York, with 1500 men to reinforce the Garrison- the fleet was under the Command of Sir George Collier; it proved sufficient to prevent the escape of the American fleet, which were all Captured- that did not run up the river & be destroyed by the Americans- Your deponent with many others were captured & sent to Halifax and there imprisoned, we were called rebels & was so treated All but starved. The treatment caused great mortality among the Prisoners that 2 from every 3 died from two crews belonging to Portsmouth (in about 8 months). Your deponent was exchanged 25th of Nov 1779, arrived the Cape Ann Jan’y 1780 having been absent from Portsmouth Eight months, had been sick twice in prison with the prevailing feaver and when arrived too sick to be exposed as I was compelled to be, before I reached my father’s house- to which your deponent was immediately confined with the same feaver- from which I was unable to be abroad until the May following making One whole year, all of this occurring by reason of being impressed from 1779 to May 1780, and then not able to do anything until the fall of that year- In 1781 January your deponent entered on board Ship Hector- Tho’s Manning Comm’r 18 Guns with 100 men- few months we were Captured by the British frigate Virginia of 32 guns, carried to Bermuda, was soon released (arrived at Portsmouth) Went next on board Sloop Fox same Capt. Manning; few weeks we captured 3 British ships, very valuable, one of which your deponent bro’t into Port 1781- next on board cutter Grey-hound 8 guns Samuel Stacy Esq. Command’r, with this vessel we captured a Brig of equal force by boarding- she was taken with Brandy, Wine, with a few bales of dry goods- she arrived safe- but we were captured by the Assurance 44 gun ship, Sir Andrew Douglas Command’r- carried to New York (where we suffered badly) after a few months were released- In 1782 I engaged myself as Lieut. On board the Brig Scorpion of 12 guns, John Stokle Commander- in this Vessel, I met the Peace of 1783-“

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HMS Emerald Muster Roll of Virginia Men (April 1778)

This List of 75 Officers and Men of the Frigate Virginia captured on 31 March 1778 and entered on the muster of HMS Emerald (ADM 36/7830) was transcribed at the National Archives in Kew, England by Joseph and Joshua Ross in February 2014. Seventy-two of the men were entered on the Emerald on 31 March with three more marked with + sign entered on 1 April. A total of 26 officers and men marked with an * asterick were exchanged on 11 April 1778. All others were subsequently entered on the muster of HMS St. Albans on 12 April 1778 which carried the remaining prisoners not exchanged to New York City where they were distributed among the prison ships Judith, Preston and Thunder Bomb.

The 30-gun Continental frigate Virginia was taken without a fight on Tuesday 31 March 1778 by British frigates Emerald and Richmond after losing her rudder and running aground in the Chesapeake Bay while attempting to evade the enemy. According to Emerald’s Captain Benjamin Caldwell, the frigate Richmond joined the Emerald at ten in the morning and “at Noon employed bringing the Prisoners onboard.” The afternoon was spent boarding the American prisoners but before Emerald “weigh’d and made Sail with the Prize” that evening, crewman Bartholomew Kelly was punished “with 12 Lashes, for quarreling and fighting”.

The circumstances and details of the 11 April 1778 exchange of 26 officers and men belonging to the frigate Virginia is not entirely clear. It appears that fourteen of that number were presented by Lieutenant Joshua Barney for exchange prior to the St. Albans departure for New York on 14 April 1778 based on a letter from Emerald’s Captain Benjamin Caldwell to the Virginia’s former commander Captain James Nicholson dated 30 April 1778. “I this evening received your letter to Captn: Onslow, of the 25th. instant, who left this the 14th, and carried with him to New York, all the officers and Crew of the Virginia you left behind;—having waited, (as he informed me,) more than a reasonable time for an answer, to his letters, relative to a general exchange of them. Mr: Burney has brought fourteen people, to be exchanged, and as we have but two prisoners at present on board, the remaining twelve, I give a receipt for, and shall write to New York, to have that number of your people Returned immediately, which no doubt will be done.” Another later letter from Caldwell to British Commodore William Hotham dated 14 May also speaks about an exchange, although it is not certain if it is the same one. “I have received twelve men from Baltimore in exchange for twelve of the Virginia’s Crew, and promissed that twelve should be exchanged for them, as per list inclosed.” Interestingly the fourteen of the first letter and the twelve of the second result in a sum of 26, the precise number of men exchanged on 11 April 1778.

John Sleymaker
Joshua Barney
Thomas Pownal
William Barney *
David Murron *
Charles Chelton *
Liven Langret *
Thomas Jennings
James Fulton
Samuel Murron *
Peter Sharp *
Alexander Duffy *
Thomas James
James Ragan
John Grimes
Stephen Burn *
Thomas Seymour *
Jacob Tycen *
John Walter *
Benjamin Thompson *
John Young
Jacob Long *
John Radley *
Joseph Halston *
Denis Larken
Shed’k Davis *
David Brenan
Robert Lambert
Sim’n Benjamin
John Dick
Denis Coleman
Edward Bolf
John McKew
James Stackaball
Michael Carney
Henry Lawrence
Richard Clarke
Thomas Eunich
Lau’e Molten
James Stephenson
Anthony Higgins
John Grant
George Teague *
Will Guthrie *
Richard Foster *
Andrew Moor
Richard Jones *
Michael Neigle
Alexander Burrell *
George Clark *
John Killen
John Herring
Patrick Lynch
John McFerline
George Gilles
Henry Mills
William Anderson
James Wallace
David Spring *
Clement Cannon *
Samuel Ropkins *
Jervis Boswell
Matthew Richards
Hampton Round *
Henry Spencer
Joseph Newton
James Lynch
Joseph Griffiths
John Power
Will Rice
Anthony Hanson
Anthony Remey
Thomas Nelson +
Joshua Tull +
Anthony Bell +

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HMS Richmond Muster Roll of Virginia Men (April 1778)

This List of 30 Officers and Men of the Frigate Virginia captured on 31 March 1778 and entered on the muster of HMS Richmond (ADM 36/7833) on 1 April 1778 was transcribed at the National Archives in Kew, England by Joseph and Joshua Ross in February 2014. All were subsequently entered on the muster of HMS St. Albans on 13 April 1778 which carried the remaining prisoners not exchanged on 11 April 1778 to New York City where they were distributed among the prison ships Judith, Preston and Thunder Bomb.

The 30-gun Continental frigate Virginia (James Nicholson) was taken without a fight on Tuesday 31 March 1778 by British frigates Emerald and Richmond after losing her rudder and running aground in the Chesapeake Bay while attempting to evade the enemy. According to Emerald’s Captain Benjamin Caldwell, the frigate Richmond joined the Emerald at ten in the morning and “at Noon employed bringing the Prisoners onboard.” The Journal of Captain John Lewis Gidoin concurs with Caldwell’s account that the afternoon was spent with “Boats Empd [employed] bringing prisoners from the Virginia”. The day was also noted for the death of Richmond’s carpenter William Stubbs.

William Jackson
Richard Wisewau
John Lee
Jacob Fox
Timothy Burn
William Padeson
Boswell James
Philip Sovel
Daniel McDonald
John Langdon
Charles Fay
Aaron Williams
Joshua William Morgan
Walter Taylor
John Baptist Roberts
Peter duRask (Kask)
Jeremiah Brun
Frederick McDonald
Peter Fems
Joseph Day
John Jones
Isaac Pirris
Richards Watts
Joseph McGrigor
John Mathews
John King
Charles Endele
Joseph Jimes
Thomas Dunnick
Thomas Osoncoatt

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Alphabetical List of Officers and Men of the Frigate Virginia captured on 31 March 1778

The Alphabetical List of 124 Officers and Men of the Frigate Virginia captured on 31 March 1778 is derived from the rolls of the HMS Emerald (ADM 36/7830), HMS Richmond (ADM 36/7833) and HMS St. Albans (ADM 36/7857) transcribed at the National Archives in Kew, England by Joseph and Joshua Ross in February 2014. The list has been edited to offer a complete spelling of the abbreviated Christian name in order to assist internet browsing and has been annotated to include various derivations of names in brackets from entries in all three British vessels. The list includes rate or quality if noted in the Muster records.

The 30-gun Continental frigate Virginia (James Nicholson) was taken without a fight on 31 March 1778 by British frigates Emerald (Benjamin Caldwell) and Richmond (John Lewis Gidoin) after losing her rudder and running aground in the Chesapeake Bay while attempting to evade the enemy. Normally carrying a compliment of 170 men, many had been left behind on the Virginia’s tender when the frigate left Annapolis, including Lieutenant John Fanning and Captain of Marines Thomas Plunkett. In a controversial manner, Captain James Nicholson left the vessel with nine volunteers in the ship’s barge just before her capture. Reporting to Vice Admiral Viscount Howe on 3 April 1778, Emerald’s commander Captain Benjamin Caldwell writes, “ I have the honour to acquaint Your Lordship, of our having taking the Rebel Frigate Virginia, of thirty Guns and one hundred and Fifty Nine Men, (there was many more Men belonging to Her, but some were Sick on Shore, and others left behind).

The thirty-five men not entered in the musters of Emerald, Richmond and St. Albans were probably on the Emerald’s tender Conqueror, sloop Senegal, ship Ariel, remained on board the Virginia assisting in rudder repairs and sailing the crippled prize or entered into British service. Examination of the Senegal’s Muster (ADM 36/7770) or Ariel’s Muster (ADM 36/7937) and the Virginia’s Prize Court Records (HCA 32/475/14) shed no light on the matter. Afterward, the Virginia was libeled, condemned and taken into the Royal Navy on 19 May 1778 as HM frigate Virginia (John Orde) with her prize shares divided among Emerald, Richmond, St. Albans (Richard Onslow), Senegal (Anthony J.P. Molloy) and Ariel. The two American perspectives on the tragic loss of the frigate Virginia are captured in the narratives of the two Continental Navy protagonists, escaped Captain James Nicholson and imprisoned Lieutenant Joshua Barney.

Two days after the loss, Nicholson presents his defense to the Marine Committee of the Continental Congress explaining, “This will inform you of my misfortune in losing the Virginia, at three o’clock in the morning of the 31st ult. I had weighed from Annapolis at eight the preceding morning, and had taken the advantage of going down the Bay in company with a brig which had a pilot on board, supposed to be one of the best in the Bay, to whom I had agreed to give 100 provided he carried me out clear of the ground. The wind blew hard at N.W. and in every other respect it was a most favourable time; and altho’ my tender was absent with 19 hands, I thought it most adviseable to proceed. At the above mentioned time she struck on the Middle Ground, and in about an hour and an half beat over it, with the loss of her rudder, and making as much water as we could well clear her from with four pumps; in which case, we thought it was adviseable to come to an anchor until day light, when we found one of the enemy’s ships about two gunshots off, abreast of us, and another further up the Bay; upon which I hoisted out my barge, and took such of my crew as inclined to run the risque of getting on shore, viz. 10 including myself, and with the greatest difficulty I got on Cape Henry, where I waited until 10 o’clock, when I saw the two ships. I immediately went to Portsmouth, got a boat, and came on board the St. Alban’s with a flag, in order to procure the parole of my officers, which I expect to accomplish; after which I shall proceed to Baltimore, and from thence shall immediately wait on Congress. The Virginia is obliged to be towed, and is not yet got up.

Many years later Barney remembers in his autobiography, “… at day light we saw three of the Enemy’s Frigates near us, we had passed them; & the loss of our rudder prevented us getting to sea, the moment Capt. Nicholson saw the Enemy he ordered the Barge to be hoisted out & left us, not waiting to take his papers or even the private Signals with him & in that manner escaped onshore; so soon as he was gone I ordered the Cable cut, in order to run the Ship on shore at Cape Henry, which could very easily have been done, the wind being fair, but in this I was overruled by the other Lieut. & Pilot, who declared we could not approach the land so that all I could say was without effect: the men gave themselves up, broke open store & slop room got drunk &c & would do nothing. I then cut the Rudder away which hung by its ropes & at 10 O’clock the Enemy’s Frigate Emerald Capt. Caldwell came & took possession of our Ship… The next day Capt. Nicholson came on bd. in a Flag of Truce to enquire after his Cloaths, on which occasion I could not help upbraiding him with his conduct in quitting his ship the first man, who if he had remained onbd. there was not the least doubt but we should have ran the Ship on shore where she might have been destroyed by which means prevented her falling into the enemies hands & saved 300 men from being made prisoners.”

William Anderson
James Arn
Joshua Barney, 2nd Lieutenant
William Barney, Lieutenant of Marines
Anthony Bell
Simon Benjamin
Edward Bolf
Jervis Boswell
David Brenan
Jeremiah Brun
Thomas Burke
Stephen Burn, Midshipman
Timothy Burn
Alexander Burrell
Clement Cannon, Master’s Mate
Michael Carney
Charles Chelton, Purser
George Clark
Richard Clarke
Denis Coleman
Shed’k Davis
Joseph Day
Thomas Dennison
John Dick
Michael Dollas
Alexander Duffy, Master
Thomas Dunnick
Peter duRask
Charles Endele [Indle]
Thomas Eunich
Charles Fay
Peter Fems
Richard Foster
Jacob Fox
James Fulton, Surgeon’s 1st Mate
George Gilles [Giles]
John Grant
Joseph Griffiths
John Grimes
Will Guthrie
Joseph Halston
Anthony Hanson
Thomas Harcombe
John Herring
Anthony Higgins
William Jackson
Thomas James, Midshipman
Boswell James
Thomas Jennings
Joseph Jimes [Tims]
Jacob Jobb
Richard Jones
John Jones
Edward Kelly
John Killen, Captain’s Clerk
John King
Robert Lambert
John Langdon
Liven Langret, Master
Denis [Daniel] Larken
Richard Francis Larrimore
Henry Lawrence
John Lee
John Lomas
Jacob Long
Patrick Lynch
James Lynch
John Mathews
Daniel McDonald
Frederick McDonald
Charles McDonald
John McFerline
Joseph McGregor [McGrigor]
John McHenry
John McKew
James McMahon
Henry Mills
Lawrence Molten [Molton]
Andrew Moor [Moer]
Joshua William Morgan
David Murron, Surgeon
Samuel Murron, Surgeon’s 2nd Mate
Michael Neigle [Nigle]
Thomas Nelson
Joseph Newton
Thomas Osoncoatt
William Padeson
James Philips
Isaac Pirris
John Power
Thomas Pownal, 1st Lieutenant of Marines
John Radley
James Ragan
Anthony Remey [Renny]
Will Rice
Matthew Richards
Nathaniel Richards
John Baptist Roberts
Samuel Ropkins, Master’s Mate
Hampton Round, Midshipman
Thomas Seymour, AB
John Shanks
Peter Sharp, Midshipman
John Sleymaker, 1st Lieutenant
Philip Sovel
Henry Spencer, Carpenter
David Spring, Gunner
William Stack
James Stackable
James Stephenson
Walter Taylor
George Teague
John Thomas
Benjamin Thompson, Midshipman
Joshua Tull
Jacob Tycen, AB
James Wallace
John Walter, AB
Richard Watts
Thomas Westmuch
Aaron Williams
Richard Wisewau
Mathew Wright
John Young, Midshipman

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Confederacy Men entered into British Service on HMS Orpheus (April 1781)

List of Men from the “Confederacy Frigate” captured on 14 April 1781 and entered the following day into British service on the roll of the HMS Orpheus (ADM 36/10099) transcribed at the National Archives in Kew, England by Joseph and Joshua Ross in February 2014.

Peter Grant
James Moyland
John Hambleton
Thomas Wharton
George Griffy
John Steel
David Thomas

Posted in Announcements, Frigate Confederacy | Leave a comment